Download A Companion to Persius and Juvenal by Susanna Braund, Josiah Osgood PDF

By Susanna Braund, Josiah Osgood

A better half to Persius and Juvenal breaks new flooring in its in-depth concentrate on either authors as "satiric successors"; targeted person contributions recommend unique views on their paintings, and supply an in-depth exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives.

  • Provides particular and updated counsel at the texts and contexts of Persius and Juvenal
  • Offers immense dialogue of the reception of either authors, reflecting one of the most leading edge paintings being performed in modern Classics
  • Contains a radical exploration of Persius' and Juvenal's afterlives

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Additional resources for A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

Sample text

His desire, he tells us, is identical to Horace’s in the passage quoted above, namely to try his hand at poetry in the style of Lucilius: “Nevertheless, why I’d rather rush across the same plain through which the great native son of Aurunca [¼ Lucilius, referring to his birthplace, Suessa Aurunca] steered his horses . . I will explain” (cur tamen hoc potius libeat decurrere campo, | per quem magnus equos Auruncae flexit alumnus | . . 19–21). We note, then, that both Juvenal and Horace never actually say that they are driven to poetry because they have a burning desire to engage in public moral censure.

10, once again, shows Horace playfully attacking Lucilius under the guise of offering a cogent literary theory of his own. In fact – and here I would suggest, just to be clear, that this was almost certainly by design – it all ends up a little garbled, and his criticisms of Lucilius are less trenchant than his rhetoric at first might lead one to believe. 10 reiterate the points he made about Lucilius in Sat. 4, but he frames them as a counter-response from fans of Lucilius, who objected to Horace’s criticisms of him as prolix and stylistically turgid.

These lines describe, in other words, that point where aesthetics collide and fuse with moral pretenses. Horace told us in Book 1 that his father had taught him to recognize vice in others, but should we really believe that this alone drives him to write poetry attacking such behavior? 79). 1) rather than himself a producer of verse. His desire, he tells us, is identical to Horace’s in the passage quoted above, namely to try his hand at poetry in the style of Lucilius: “Nevertheless, why I’d rather rush across the same plain through which the great native son of Aurunca [¼ Lucilius, referring to his birthplace, Suessa Aurunca] steered his horses .

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