Download Cincinnati Police Department Traffic Stops: Applying RAND's by Greg Ridgeway PDF

By Greg Ridgeway

In 2002, the Cincinnati Police division (CPD) joined with different organisations and enterprises to enhance police-community family members within the urban. This document specializes in the research of racial disparities in site visitors stops in Cincinnati. The authors locate no facts of racial transformations among the stops of black and people of equally positioned nonblack drivers, yet a few matters can exacerbate the belief of racial bias.

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Extra info for Cincinnati Police Department Traffic Stops: Applying RAND's Framework to Analyze Racial Disparities

Sample text

Lamberth (2003) described a traffic survey in which the driver’s race could be identified in 95 percent of the vehicles but for which nighttime observations required auxiliary lighting. Greenwald (2001) canceled plans for evening surveys after his observer could identify the race of only 6 percent of the drivers viewed around dusk. An overly simplistic implementation of this analysis would compare the percentage of black drivers among those stopped during daylight with the percentage of black drivers among those stopped at night.

20 is considered a small effect size, a value much larger than any effect size computed for this comparison. b For the comparison stops, n represents the effective sample size. c The neighborhoods have been given random letter codes to mask the officers’ identities. considerably less than 71 percent black drivers, further investigation of this officer is in order. To internally benchmark Officer 534, we located 571 stops that collectively have the same distribution of stop features as the stops made by the officer in question, as shown in the table.

Nonetheless, this will be of little solace to the many searched black drivers, even if all the searches were legitimate and conducted professionally. 4). ) As we saw with all high-discretion searches, in recent years (from 2005 on), stops involving black drivers are less likely to involve a search based on consent. However, stops of black Are There Racial Disparities in the Outcomes of Stops? 5 Nonblack drivers (unmatched) a We found statistically significant differences between the rates for black and matched nonblack drivers.

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